A week in Hawaii with Matt Komo

A week in Hawaii with Matt Komo

H A W A I I | Matt Komo explores the Aloha State

Most people know of Matt Komo from his iconic personal content on YouTube and Instagram, but many don’t know he is also a prolific content creator behind the camera for some of the biggest names in the entertainment industry.

He has worked with the likes of the Chainsmokers, Steve Aoki, Martin Garrix, on top of his work with the biggest brands in the world. An MTV project took Matt to Hawaii recently and, true to form, a cinematic vlog followed.

When Matt Komo and friends find themselves in Hawaii for a week, we get a fun perspective on one of the most beautiful states in the union.

When he uses our Luminary glass overlays, we get a solid example of how to employ the effects both creatively and sparingly at the same time.

“Dynamic transitions that carry the story along are a hallmark of my films,” Matt said. “Luminary gives me another creative option to play with in post and adapt to my own signature style.”

Check out the 0:25 second mark to see how he used a Luminary 4K overlay to tie a few waterfall shots together. At 4:22 you’ll notice a clever sequence where Matt arranged one of the effects followed by a leaf shot for visual consistency.

See more of Matt’s work on Youtube and Instagram.

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Light Painting with Eric Paré

Light Painting with Eric Paré

Light Painting with Eric Paré

Eric Paré is a Canadian visual artist who has been performing light-painting all around the world since 2013. When he is not traveling in deserts or by the sea, he can be found in his studio in Montreal where he has developed a full 360 degree camera system with his team. His most recent international projects were made with Adobe, Twitter, Bacardi/Dewar’s, Dom Perignon and Fotolia.
Eric picked up a handful of our Photoshop products and has been dropping us finished images ever since. With the release of his new behind-the-scenes film “Signs of Light,” we couldn’t help but get the scoop on what goes into his unique images.
Your style of photography is quite unique. Give us an overview of this technique and what’s involved?

I’m a photographer, but I spend my time in front of the camera instead of behind. But even then, I’m never visible. That’s what light-painting is about. I draw light by hand, generally in one second. I disappear by hiding behind the model and making sure I don’t get hit with the light.

I did my first experiments in a 360 degree system where my light-painting was captured in 3D. I had quite a good success with my first bullet-time stop-motion light-painting project LightSpin, but a few months later, I realized that the technique itself was also very cool using a single camera.

 

Eric Pare

Edited with Fog and Shimmer

Eric Pare

Edited with Fog and Shimmer

Eric Pare

Edited with Fog and Shimmer

My first non-360 project was with Fotolia and digital artist Mike Campau. It involved a very intensive composite on top of my light-painting. I did some attempts by myself in the months following the project, but never got happy with the results. It’s only recently that I started doing composites with my pictures, adding Shimmer, Fog, and other craziness from the Lens Distortions store (thanks to this Fstoppers article for making me discover those packs!)
In my pictures, the light-painting and the reflection are always 100% real (created by hand). Using a wireless remote control and a DSLR in bulb mode, I move my light behind Kim, creating all sort of shapes. She has that super power of being able to keep a very stable pose which gets me those crisp/clean images.

“I’m a photographer, but I spend my time in front of the camera instead of behind. But even then, I’m never visible. That’s what light-painting is about.”

You describe yourself as a visual artist. Did you start in photography and develop this technique and style over time, or did you start out with these visual compositions in mind?
I learned photography a long time ago and did a few years as a professional photographer, but I got bored of it. I felt like I wasn’t bringing anything special, so I stopped for a while. I started back 3 years ago after a crazy month of experimentation in my pitch black studio. It is through intensive sessions of trial and error that I came up with the one-second technique that I still use a lot today.
Tell us a bit about how you use Lens Distortions effects in your work.
Lens Distortions packs are great add-ons for me as I use effects to fill some empty parts of my pictures. They give me options and help me get a good balance in the overall composition. They’re easy to use and fit well with my style.
Eric Pare

Edited with Fog and Shimmer

Eric Pare

Edited with Fog

Eric Pare

Edited with Fog and Luminary

Any fun stories from your projects?
When we went to Holbox for the second time, we were having high expectations about the weather and the visuals we would get since we had a heavenly experience the year before. When we arrived, the wind was very strong and it was cold at night, so we couldn’t shoot by the sea. We managed to find another place inside the island, a calm swamp.
The second night we were shooting there, the water level was higher, right below my knees. I remember thinking to myself : “I hope there are no animals in here…” The next day during breakfast, we looked at a map of the island to see if we could find another place where the water was calm… And I saw a crocodile image near our previous spot. After some research, we found that they organized tours to see crocodiles near the place we were shooting at!
We still went back for a third night. But that last shoot there was ridiculously stressful. Even though we were told by locals that they were too small to attack human beings, each time I would leave to go look at the cameras, Kim would scan the area with light and uselessly search for something in the night… Nothing was different from the previous nights, except our frame of mind. The best part was at the end, when we decided to stay in pitch black for 10 minutes to do a long exposure shot of the stars.
Photo Credits:
Eric Paré & Kim Henry
Eric currently uses Luminary, Shimmer, Fog, and Principle Light Hits from Lens Distortions.
Lens Distortions packs are great add-ons for me… They give me options and help me get a good balance in the overall composition.
Eric Paré

Visual Artist

Introducing: Luminary

Introducing: Luminary

Lens Distortions brought the iconic glass shoot-through technique to post with our flagship product called Legacy. It’s now time to take this concept to a whole new level. Luminary is the quintessential example of this signature style.

From delicate to assertive, these glass textures offer you a unique way to complement your subject, frame your shot, and add complexity to your visuals.

Luminary for Photo

Accentuate your subject and further draw the viewers eye to your focal point with richly detailed reflective elements.

Refined Selection. Limitless Possibilities.

Luminary offers 75 unique filters to compliment your images.

Dialed in, these effects will subtly blend into your shot. However, you can also achieve bold, dramatic looks by layering multiple effects and boosting their color settings.

Ryan Thompson - Cinespace - Exporation
Ryan Thompson - Cinespace - Exporation
Ryan Thompson - Cinespace - Exporation

Luminary for Video

Harness the iconic styles of elite filmmakers. Luminary provides distinguished glass elements to achieve the cinematic gravitas of acclaimed productions.

Ryan Thompson - Cinespace - Exporation

Elegant Textures In Motion.

With 90 unique filters to choose from you have endless possibilities in post-production.

Expand your creative options and give your film that visceral feel.

Distinguish Your Visuals

Since day one Lens Distortions has focused on creating premium effects worthy of your portfolio. Our products have been featured in projects from notable artists and brands all over the world. Luminary has raised the bar once again.

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